Bare in mind that it is always very dusty inside the canyon not only from walking through the sand but also from from the sand that is thrown around by tour guides to emphasise rays of light.  Keep your lenses covered if you are not taking pictures and maybe even your camera.  Do not change your lens inside the canyon under any circumstances.  Think in advance which lens you want to use.  We were using two cameras with two different lenses to give us more flexibility.  One of us was using a prime 14mm lens which gave us some amazing photos with different angles, more coverage and great depth.  The only disadvantage of this lens is that you can't zoom so you have to think about the composition very carefuly.  Because it covers great space, it is difficult to get shots without people.  The other was using 24-105mm lens which gave us more flexibility for close ups and composition.  

 

Below is the example of the same place taken by the same full frame cameras but different lenses.  The one on the left is taken by 24-105mm lens at 24mm zoom and the one on the right hand side by 14mm lens.

 

 

 

 

 

Beams occur most often in the summer months, as they require the sun to be high in the sky. Winter colors are a little more subtle.  Light beams start to peek into the canyon March 15 and disappear October 7 each year.

 

Photographers love the beauty and unique shapes and lighting conditions of the canyons.  Let your imagination run wild and you can discover lots of little gems along the way.  For example the photo above can remind you of Monument Valley or the photo below has a nice heart shape.  Don't forget to ask your tour guide to point these shapes out to you.

 

 

Navajo calls the Upper Antelope Canyon Tsé bighánílíní which means "the place where water runs through rocks".   Flash flooding still occurs in the canyon and may, at times, result in up to several months of closing.

 

​Your can play with the images in post-processing or even shoot in monochrome thus achieving different results as shown below.

 

 

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